About the Artists

David Howard Hitchcock

David Howard HitchcockDavid Howard Hitchcock Hilo, Hawaii / 1861-1943   Schooling in Paris laid the groundwork for Hitchcock to capture landscapes and dramatic views, such as his dioramas or mural-size paintings, in an iconic impressionistic style. Traveling thru Hawaii’s wild terrain in the 1900’s, he was one of the first artists to paint an untouched Waimea Canyon. Exposure to contemporary work in New York and Hawaii inspired Hitchcock to modernize his treatment of the landscape. A 1928 Honolulu Star-Bulletin review commented “some of his new efforts are said to be daring, tending toward the ‘modern’ but extreme.” Hitchcock was a prime mover in the Honolulu arts scene as a founding force behind the Kilohana Art League (1894), a constant exhibitor at the Honolulu Academy of Arts, even given a retrospective exhibition there for his 75th birthday. Abroad, his paintings were shown and awarded in Seattle, San Francisco and New York. Image by David W. Forbes in Encounters with Paradise, courtesy of the Honolulu Academy of ArtsRead More...

Jules Tavernie

Jules TavernieAlthough Jules Tavernier (Paris, France / 1844 - 1889) worked fewer than five years in Hawaii, he is often thought of as the premier interpreter of the volcano. His life travels would be in summary one journey westward. After attending Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris and a fight in the Franco-Prussian War, Tavernier "left for London on the day the Armistice was signed" at the close of the Franco-Prussian War. He would continue his travels to New York to San Francisco becoming a founding member of the Bohemian and the Palette clubs and a vice-president of the San Francisco Art Association. Tavernier arrived in Honolulu late in 1884 to escape California creditors. He was enthusiastic and his volcano paintings created a sensation when first shown. During the later part of his life, Tavernier would rework earlier western scenes by memory. Up until his death, he kept a reputation as impractical and improvident as ever.   The above information and photos are sourced from Encounters with Paradise by David W. Forbes, courtesy Honolulu Academy of Arts.Read More...

Charles W. Bartlett

Charles W. BartlettCharles W. Bartlett (Bridgport, England / 1860- ) first trained as a chemist but took up art full-time in 1883 and studied at the Royal Academy in London and the Julian Academy in Paris. He became well known in Holland and Brittany for his watercolors and etchings. The Orient was his second source of inspiration, and many of his subjects were drawn from India and China. During a residence in Japan early in this century he became intrigued with woodblock printing techniques, and a large number of color prints, executed under his direction, are now his most recognizable work. When Charles Bartlett arrived in Hawaii in February 1917, he met with such an enthusiastic welcome, particularly from Anna (Mrs. Charles M.) Cooke, that he postponed his departure several times and finally determined to remain in Hawaii. From the earliest years of his career, Bartlett was also a portrait painter of note, using two different styles during his years in Hawaii. Finely executed watercolors of an ethereal nature, reminiscent of early Song-dynasty paintings, were done as intimate portraits. He reserved his impressionistic technique for large canvases, the finest of which are the portraits of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Wilcox, at Grove Farm Homestead on Kauai, and of his friend and patron Mrs. Cooke, in the Honolulu Academy of Arts. Before his arrival in Hawaii, Bartlett had exhibited at the Royal Academy and at the Salon des Beaux-Arts, Paris. He was a frequent exhibitor at the Academy of Arts and had a one-person show there in June 1939. A posthumous retrospective was held at the academy in 1946. Bartlett had several exhibitions of his popular prints in London and New York. He died in Honolulu on April 16, 1940. The above information and photos are taken from Encounters with Paradise by David W. Forbes, courtesy Honolulu Academy of Arts.Read More...

Hawaiian Paintings - Lionel Walden

Hawaiian Paintings - Lionel WaldenLionel Walden was born in Norwich, Connecticut, on May 22, 1861, but spent his early years in various cities before going to Minnesota, where his father served as the rector of an Episcopal church. There Walden first became interested in art. Later, in Paris, he studied under E. A. Carolus-Duran and became as adept at figure painting as he later would be at seascapes. A frequent exhibitor in the Paris Salons, he received medals in 1900 and 1903 and was made a Knight of the French Legion of Honor in 1910. Walden also exhibited to acclaim at the Saint Louis Exposition of 1900 and the Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco in 1915. His first visit to Hawaii in 1911 was by the invitation of fellow artist Kimo Wilder, with whom he stayed at Waikiki and on Tantalus. In April 1912 Walden returned to France but he spent half his time in the islands, and more during World War I. Although he specialized in seascapes, he continued to produce landscapes and volcano scenes. For a number of years he also gave private lessons and, in collaboration with D. Howard Hitchcock and other artists, produced murals for public buildings in Honolulu. Walden was a frequent contributor to group shows, and after the Honolulu Academy of Arts opened in 1927, for a number of years the artist had at least one canvas in every group exhibition of the Hawaiian Society of Artists. He died in Chantilly on July 12, 1933. Lionel Walden was the finest seascape painter to work in Hawaii. He was magnetized by the colors he saw in the landscape and the sea. "I have watched the moon rise over that mountain (Diamond Head) and seen the silvery sheen on the swell as it rolls over the beach," he commented to a reporter. Although his scenes of white frothy waves dashing dramatically against rocky coasts are most familiar, he painted the sea in all its moods, colors, and actions. The above information and photos are taken from Encounters with Paradise by David W. Forbes, courtesy Honolulu Academy of Arts.Read More...

Hawaiian Paintings - Madge Tennent

Hawaiian Paintings - Madge TennentMadge Tennent was both well trained and well traveled before she arrived in Hawaii in 1923. She was born Madeline Cook in Doulwich, England, in 1889. When she was five she moved with her family to Cape Town, South Africa. At the age of twelve, she entered an art school in Cape Town, and the following year her parents, who recognized and encouraged her talent, moved to Paris to enable Madeline to study there. In Paris, she studied figure drawing under William Bouguereau, an experience that laid the technical foundation for her later figural drawings and paintings. She and her family subsequently returned to South Africa, and after her marriage in 1915 to Hugh Cowper Tennenet, she relocated to his native New Zealand. In 1917 Hugh Tennent accepted a position as treasurer to the government of British Samoa. During her stay in Samoa, the artist became fascinated with Polynesians, and while on a leave of several months in Australia, Tennent studied with Julian Ashton "and learned," she said, "to draw seriously for the first time." In 1923 the Tennents left Samoa to go to England, stopping in Hawaii. They were entranced with the islands and were persuaded to stay, beginning what was described by an acquaintance as "the most compatible of marriages between Madge Tennent the artist and the golden people of Hawaii." Tennent helped support her family with commissions to paint and draw portraits of children. A friend's gift of a book on Gauguin set her on an artistic course that lasted fifty years, during which she portrayed Hawaiian women in a style that increasingly became her own. Tennent had one-person shows at the Honolulu Academy of Arts, and her works have been exhibited in London, Paris, New York, Chicago, and San Francisco as well as frequently in Honolulu. An important exhibition of her oil paintings was held at the Comtemporary Arts Center, Honolulu Advertiser Gallery, in 1968. In failing health, Tennent stopped working in 1965, when she was seventy-six. She died in Honolulu on February 5, 1972. The above information and photos are taken from Encounters with Paradise by David W. Forbes, courtesy Honolulu Academy of Arts.Read More...